Paediatric Sinusitis – Part 1 (What is Paediatric Sinusitis?)

November 5, 2013

What is Paediatric Sinusitis?

tPaeBabies are born with no immune system and it is only though the mothers breast milk that some immunity is acquired. As a baby grows and develops into a child he/she begins to slowly develop his/her immune system.

As ones immune system is not developed before the first several years of one’s life, it makes it easier for viruses, bacteria and other harmful agents to wreak havoc on a child system. Children are most susceptible to developing infections in the sinus cavities, nose and ear regions.

Paediatric sinusitis occurs when a child develops sinusitis after a normal cold or flu. Should this sinusitis persist, it can develop into chronic sinusitis. Physicians and otolaryngologists are often consulted to treat not only sinusitis but also help with associated symptoms. Antibiotics are usually the recommended treatment for paediatric sinusitis.

Children, like adults have 4 paired sinus cavities, the maxillary, sphenoid, ethmoid and frontal sinus cavities. At birth children have their ethmoid and maxillary sinus cavities and as they grow, the sphenoid and frontal sinus cavities develop. This occurs around the ages of 5 and 7. A child’s sinus cavities are smaller in size and have smaller openings through which mucus can drain. It is also more common for children to develop sinusitis in their ethmoid and maxillary sinus cavities.

There are three distinctions that differentiate levels of sinusitis in children:

  1. Acute Sinusitis occurs when one or more of the sinus cavities become infected and inflamed.
  2. Chronic Sinusitis occurs when the condition has persisted for longer than two months.
  3. Recurrent Sinusitis occurs when a child keeps developing sinusitis over a period a time with medical treatment providing only temporary relief.

The development of chronic sinusitis can often be a result of an immunodeficiency in a child, cystic fibrosis, an allergy such as hayfever or allergic rhinitis or even a syndrome whereby the cilia’s functioning is impaired called Immotile Cilia Syndrome.

What makes it so difficult to effectively treat bacterial sinusitis is that if a child is given antibiotics too frequently his or her body can build up a resistance to antibiotics. Frequent antibiotic use can also result in unwanted negative effects on a young child’s development.

Please be aware: Any cold or flu like symptoms that your child has and that persist over a period of 10-14 days are not always caused by a sinus infection as these can also be related to a common cold or flu.

Advertisements

Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis – A Killer in Itself

December 10, 2012

thrombosis_cavernous_sinusAn eye, nose, tooth or throat infection left untreated has the potential to spread to the sinus veins located behind the eyes causing blood clots which have the potential to become fatal. This is what happened in 2006 with a 17 year old dying from this condition.

Surgeons have however noted that this condition is rare and research is still underway to find out why the infection spreads to the sinus veins behind the eyes.

Other signs of Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis include a loss of vision, bulging eyes, headaches  and a swelling of the conjunctiva, symptoms not uncommon with sinus infections.


A deviated septum

July 18, 2011

What is a septum?

The septum is a wall dividing the nasal passages and sinus cavities in two. This wall is made mainly of bone while the front portion is made of cartilage. The septum together with the nasal passages and sinus cavities are lined with mucus membranes.

 What is a deviated septum?

A deviated septum/septal deviation is when this cartilage is either damaged or crooked.

What causes a deviated septum?

There are two main causes for a deviated septum:

  1. Nasal trauma, when the septum is injured. This injury can happen during:
  • Contact sports such as boxing, skate/snow boarding, riding a bicycle, ect…
  • Household accidents such as falling, bumping into things (clumsy), fistfights, ect…
  1. Unusual nasoseptal growth patterns also known as cartilaginous growth abnormalities, which are birth defects.

Can a deviated septum cause any complications?

Yes, there are complications that include:

  • Sinusitis, which can be caused when a deviated septum blocks a sinus opening. This makes stagnant mucus a perfect place for bacteria to thrive in causing a sinus infection.
  • Congestion is caused when a deviated septum blocks the sinus opening. Mucus then builds up in the sinus cavities causing it to block.
  • Nose bleeds. There are many tiny blood vessels in the septum that can damage easily. Injuries can cause the tip or the inside of your nose to bleed.
  • Post nasal drip is the drip of mucus down the back of the throat caused by blocked sinus cavities.
  • Difficulty breathing when nasal passages are inflamed, making the passages narrow.
  • Headaches due to congestion and pressure build up in blocked sinuses.

How is septal deviation treated?

Septoplasty. This is a surgery performed to repair or straighten a damaged septum. This procedure is mainly done for people over the age of 18 as a child’s septum only stops growing around 17-18 years. Surgeons usually wait for children to reach this age before surgery is performed.

 To find out more about what the other causes of sinus problems are visit us here!

Helping you fight Sinus Problems the Natural Way.

SinusWarsTM
Safe, Natural, Trusted by thousands and Clinically proven